Legitimacy

Ka 'Ohana Ali'i Hoapili Baker    The Royal Hoapili Baker Family

Evidentiary Support for the Attribution of H.R.H. to the Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family

Announcement with 'Ōlelo Hawai'i

Announcement with 'Ōlelo Hawai'i

Announcement in English

Announcement in English

From the perspective of the use of customs and laws that structure the institution of royal families from the international level to the tradition of the Hawaiian Monarchy, the Hoapili Baker Family of Hawai'i are considered Heirs to unified Hawaiian Island leadership, as they are related by blood to the last sovereign dynasty of the Kingdom of Hawai'i, the Kalākaua Dynasty. The multiple royal and ali'i lineages of the Hoapili Baker Family of Hawai'i have been carefully traced back to the first archived Mo'ī (King) of Hawai'i Island, King Līloa, through the line of Mo'ī Keakealani of the island of Hawai'i, the ali'i of the House of Moana, Luluka, Kohala, Kamehameha and the longest reigning independent island kingdom under the royal court of Queen Kamakahelei. The substantiated historical facts concerning the genealogical background of Robert Hoapili Baker I, have been revealed in 2018 by well respected genealogist Douglas Po'oloa Tolentino.

An in-depth research was conducted over the course of six months by professional Hawaiian genealogical expert, Douglas Po'oloa Tolentino in 2018, by the invitation of Hawaiian cultural and historical expert Herman 'Helemano' Lee. A specialist in Native Hawaiian History, Mr. Tolentino trained professionally with the renowned Hawaiian historian Edith McKenzie, and served for many years as the official genealogist for the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, a Non-Profit law firm providing legal assistance to native Hawaiians. His genealogical compilations have been admitted as evidence in many court proceedings.

As it is consistent with international royal protocol and custom, the legitimate attribution of Royal rank in the Hawaiian context, and thus to that of Hawaiian Royal Heir candidacy, consists of a proven relation by blood or legal adoption to the last reigning sovereign dynasty of the Kingdom of Hawai'i.

The Royal attribution to the Hoapili Baker Family is forthright and accesible. Respecting the Hawaiian system of common law and customs of ascendance and natural descendance, the closest living descendants or blood relatives of the last ruling Ali'i Nui, or reigning sovereign in Hawai'i, Queen Lili'uokalani (and therefore her brother King David Kalākaua before her), are the Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family.

To further evince the claim of the attribution of H.R.H. to the Hoapili Baker Family, and thus a royal claim to the fons honorum of the Kingdom of Hawai'i, it is significant to observe the distinction that the Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family are related by blood to both matrimonial sides of the last reigning sovereign dynasty—both to the last reigning Primary monarchs of the unified Kingdom of Hawai’i, King David Kalākaua and his sister Queen Lydia Liliu’okalani, as well as to the Consort monarch, Queen Consort Julia Kapi'olani.

The jurisdiction of ali'i and royal Hawaiian common law and custom recognizes both male and female ascendence in the common law of natural descendance. One example of this is the fact that Queen Kamakahelei, for whom the Hoapili Baker ohana's Royal House is named, was appointed to ascend to the position of Ali'i Nui (regnant royal leader) of the island kingdom of Kaua'i instead of the male possibilities of the Royal Court of Kaua'i. Another example is the fact that King David Kalākaua designated his niece Princess Victoria Ka'iulani, daughter of his sister Princess Miriam Likelike, as the Crown Heir to the Throne of the active Kingdom of Hawai'i, instead of the extant male possibilities of the nephews of his wife, Queen Consort Julia Kapi'olani (Edward Keli'iahonui, Jonah Kūhiō Kalaniana'ole and David Kawananakoa, known as the Pi'ikoi brothers because their father was David Kahalepouli Pi'ikoi) for whom King Kalākaua created titles of (H.H.) Princes of Hawai'i in 1883.

The three ali'i Pi'ikoi brothers were Kalākaua's nephews by marriage, and thus it is understandable why their bestowed place as H.H. in the line of Succession was after the natural place of the King's blood. At the time of the illegal American annexation of the Kingdom of Hawai'i, it was an ali'i designated of the King's blood, as clearly stated in his will, H.R.H. Princess Victoria Ka'iulani––not one of his ali'i nephews by marriage––who was the living Heir apparent, or the correct Crown Heir to the Throne.

The descendants of the three Pi'ikoi brothers are also cousins to the Royal Hoapili Baker Family, because the Hoapili Baker Family are also related by blood to Queen Consort Julia Kapi'olani. As the eldest child of Royal Prince Ikekeleaiaku, Prince Robert Hoapili Baker was the grandson of Queen Kamakahelei. High Ali'i Kapi'olani was Queen Kamakahelei's great-granddaughter. Robert Hoapili Baker and Julia Kapi'olani were cousins with one generation of difference between them.

Prince Robert Hoapili Baker led the funeral procession carrying King Kalākaua's crown and scepter from the 'Iolani Palace to Mauna 'Ala (the Royal Mausoleum) during the ceremonial march, indicating his familial status and importance to the Crown. Prince Robert Hoapili Baker I's rank in the Royal Family of the last sovereign dynasty of Hawai'i, as following the line of his cousin, the Primary Sovereign, King Kalākaua, was most explicit when he was honored with the international Royal ceremonial protocol to carry the king's crown and scepter.

The Hoapili Baker Family's multiple lineages of the rank of Hawaiian Royal heritage comprise of:

the last reigning sovereign dynasty of the unified Kingdom of Hawai'i, the Royal Kalākaua dynasty, by which the High Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family are legitimately of contemporary Royal rank, as Prince Robert Hoapili Baker I was cousin to the Primary Sovereigns, King David Kalākaua and his sister Queen Lydia Lili'uokalani.

the longest reigning independent sovereign kingdom of Kaua’i and Ni'ihau, the royal dynasty of the court of Queen Kamakahelei, from whom the Royal Hoapili Baker Family share descendance with their Kawananakoa cousins, the descendants from the three sons of High Ali'i (High Chiefess) Victoria Kūhiō Kinoiki Kekaulike II (who was a sister of the Consort monarch, Queen Consort Julia Kapi'olani), who were legally adopted by her surviving sisters, Kapi'olani and Po'omaikalani, thus comprising the beginning of the House of Kawananakoa–the descendants of the Consort Monarch. The three brothers were not born as Princes but were granted the honorary distinctions of being styled as H.H. by their uncle by marriage, King Kalākaua, and it was the king's blood relative–the daughter of his youngest sister, Princess Miriam Likelike–H.R.H. the Princess Victoria Ka'iulani, who continued the rank dinstinction of the Crown Heir as the blood relative of the Primary Monarch. The House of Kawananakoa is the other surviving ali'i Family of Hawai'i associated with the last sovereign dynasty of the kingdom, and as such, they are honored with a distinction of a contemporary Royal rank, of which their accurate appellation of Royal rank is H.H., given that they constitute the descendants of the nephews of the Consort Monarch, Julia Kapi'olani. It is thus that Ka Hale Ali'i O Hoapili Baker (the Royal House of Hoapili Baker), followed by the House of Kawananakoa, constitute the surviving Royal Family of Hawai'i.

the first royal dynasty of the unified Kingdom of Hawai'i, the Kamehameha Dynasty

The Constitution of 1887, composed by King David Kalākaua served as supreme law at the time of the imposed overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawai'i in 1893. Article 22 of the Constitution outlined the royal succession:

"Pauku 22. E ho'omau loa ia ka Laiali'i no ka Mo'i Kalākaua a me na ho'olina aku o kona kino i hapai ia malalo o ke Kanawai, a i ka lakou mau mamo aku ma ke Kanawai ma ka lalai pololei; a i nele ia, e ili aku ka Leiali'i i ke Kama Ali'i Wahine Lili'uokalani, a me na ho'olina aku o kona kino i hapai ia malalo o ke Kanawai a i ka lakou mamo aku ma ke Kanawai ma ka lalani pololei. E ili aku i ke keiki kane hanau mua a me na ho'olina aku o kona kino, a i nele i ke keiki kane ole, alaila i ke kaikamahine hanau mua a me na ho'olina aku o kona kino, a i nele loa i ka ho'olina ole e like me ka olelo maluna iho, alaila e ili aku ka Leiali'i i ka mea i koho ia e ka Mo'i me ka ae ana o na 'Li'i a i ho'olina ia hoi oiai e ola ana ka Mo'i; aka, ina a'ole i kohoia a i ho'olaha ia pela a ua hakahaka koke aku e halawai ka Ahaolelo, a na ia Ahaolelo e koho ma ka balota i kekahi Ali'i hanau o ka aina i Ali'i e noho ma ka nohoali'i, a mamuli o ia ho'onoho ia ana e ho'omaka ai he Ohana Mo'i hou a e pili iaia a me kona mau mamo aku ke Kanawai e kau nei no ka ili ana aku o ka Leiali'i o ka Ohana Mo'i o Hawai'i nei."

Translated in English, Article 22 reads:

"The Crown is hereby permanently conferred to His Majesty King Kalākaua, and the Heirs of His body lawfully begotten, and to their lawful Descendants in a direct line; failing whom, the Crown shall descend to Her Royal Highness the Princess Lili'uokalani, and the heirs of her body, lawfully begotten, and their lawful descendants in a direct line. The Succession shall be to the senior male child, and to the heirs of his body; failing a male child, the succession, shall be to the senior female child, and to the heirs of her body. In case there is no heir as above provided, the Successors shall be the person whom the Sovereign shall appoint with the consent of the Nobles, and publicly proclaim during the Sovereign's life; but should there be no such appointed and proclamation, and the Throne should become vacant, then the Cabinet, immediately after the occuring of such vacancy, shall cause a meeting of the Legislature, who shall elect by ballot some native Ali'i of the Kingdom as Succesor to the Throne; and the Successor so elected shall become a new Stirps for the Royal Family; and the Succession from the Sovereign thus elected, shall be regulated by the same law as the present Royal Family of Hawai'i." 

Following constitutional procedure, the Legislature of the Kingdom of Hawai'i would have assembled to elect a Successor by ballot, since Queen Lili'uokalani had no children. However, given the fact that the official Legislature of Hawai'i was never re-convened due to the dissolution of the Kingdom of Hawai'i, Queen Lili'uokalani was the last Royal Stirps (basis of a family branch) per Article 22 of the 1887 Constitution. Thus, contemporary Royal succession claims must be based on genealogical bloodline proximity to Queen Lili'uokalani, and to her brother, King David Kalākaua, the last sovereign king of the Kingdom of Hawai'i (and not the last ruling Consort sovereign).

Na keiki ali'i (the royal and/or ali'i children) of ke ali'i Robert Hoapili Baker III are the third cousins, three descending generations removed, to Queen Lydia Lili'uokalani.

The surviving Senior Heir of the Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family at the time of the first public mention of claims to the fons honorom in 2018 on behalf of the Hoapili Baker family name and legacy who has authoritative seniority to legitimize and represent the Royal Hoapili Baker Family and legacy was and is ke ali'i George I’i Baker (H.R.H. Prince George I'i), due to his status as the eldest surviving kupuna (grandparent, or ancestor) of the generation of na keiki ali'i (children) of ke ali'i Robert Hoapili Baker III. 

After a period of internal restructuring and reorganizing, ke ali'i George Ī'ī, the Senior Heir of the Hoapili Baker family, has appointed his eldest grandchild of the blood, ke ali'i Idony Nikita Punahele Hoapili Albert (H.R.H. Princess Idony Punahele Hoapili), to serve as the appointed Head of the Royal Hoapili Baker Family of the Royal House of Hawai'i representing internationally and in Hawai'i, effective January 10th, 2020. His daughter, ke ali'i Georgette Rogée Pua'ala Baker Luppino (H.R.H. Princess Georgette Pua'ala), also serves as a family representative in the United States from Hawai'i as the C.E.O. and Chairwoman of the philanthropic arm of the Royal House of Hawai'i – Ka Hale Ali'i O Hoapili Baker, The Hoapili Baker Foundation.

There are many countries and territories which are no longer governed by a Constitutional Monarchy, however, the Royal living descendants or closest blood relations to the last sovereign dynasty of a previously monarchic country are still internationally recognized as being legitimate Royal Heirs in their country or territory in the event of a monarchy ever being reinstated to govern––hence the reason why there is still an acknowledged, legitimate Royal House in existence in such countries or territories. The descendents of the ali'i families related by blood or by legal adoption to the Kalākaua Dynasty are still acknowledged as legitimately Royal in reference to a contemporary Royal House of Hawai'i.

The living ali'i descendants who are closest blood relations to King Kalākaua and his sister Queen Lili'uokalani are recognized as the primary legitimate Heir candidates to unified island leadership. The living descendants of ali'i who were adopted legally into the Kalākaua Dynasty, namely, the descendants of the Consort Sovereign, constitute the next in line to Succession after the primary legitimate Heir candidates who are closest in blood relation to the Primary Sovereign.

The Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker 'Ohana of the legitimate representative branch of H.R.H. George Ī'i Baker will continue to actively preserve the legacy and the authenticity of the Hoapili Baker Family's royal and ali'i name, as well as that of the Royal House of Hawai'i – Ka Hale Ali'i O Hoapili Baker (the Royal House of Hoapili Baker), by maintaining its traditions and culture in a pono manner, and promoting the progressive vision of King David Kalākaua.

The Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker 'Ohana focuses on striving to promote advanced education abroad for Hawaiians, science, ocean preservation, and Hawaiian and international cultural art forms in Hawai’i, through the projects of the family’s philanthropic arm, The Hoapili Baker Foundation. The Royal House of Hawai'i – Ka Hale Ali'i O Hoapili Baker respects the beliefs and customs of Native Hawaiians, while endeavoring, in this modern age, to pursue progressive technological science and advanced educational opportunities for the keiki (youth) of the next generation.

H.R.H., Ke Ali'i George I'i Baker 

H.R.H., Ke Ali'i Prince George I'i Baker, wearing the Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Kalākaua

HRH Ke Ali'i Prince George I'i Baker, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Kalākaua

By Hawaiian custom and Hawaiian common law of natural descendance, adhering to the guidelines of succession in Kalākaua's Constitution of 1887, supporting the consensus of leading members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I in Hawai’i, and by the mutual agreement of the extended Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker family of Hawai'i and abroad, ke ali'i George Ī'i Baker, the senior surviving kupuna (elder) of the family, inherently and naturally has rightful seniority as Head, and is the correct and rightful Senior Heir of the Hoapili Baker Family who is necessary to be identified and designated as the Head of an entity representing the Hoapili Baker Family at the time of the first public claims made by any member of the Hoapili Baker Family to the fons honorum. The first public claims of bloodright to the fons honorum made by a member of the Hoapili Baker Family were in 2018. The transparent acknowledgement of ke ali'i George I’i Baker as both Senior Heir and Head of the (and any) royal organizational entity representing the Hoapili Baker Family name, royal heritage and legacy, legitimizes and accurately represents the Hoapili Baker right by blood to the fons honorum.


Ke ali'i Prince George I'i Baker is the twelfth of fifteen siblings born in Hilo, on the island of Hawai'i, to ke ali'i Robert Hoapili Baker III and ke ali'i Bernicia Ka'iliponi Lane, on September 11th, 1936. Ke ali'i George I'i was raised between Honoka'a on the island of Hawai'i and Honolulu on the island of Oahu.

In 1956 his national champion level athletic talents were discovered, and he was asked to represent the U.S. Army during basketball and baseball seasons. In the photo below at left, ke ali'i Prince George I'i is pictured in a mid-air jump shot during a basketball game between the American Army team and the Russian Army team, during which he scored 28 points. The photo below at right shows ke ali'i George I'i receiving some of his army basketball awards.

From 1957 until 1993, ke ali'i George I'i Baker worked for the Hawaiian Telephone Company, primarily as a repairman. He also served as an equipment installation technician on the company's Post Business Exchange (PBX) team which wired official rooms and offices in preparation for business and official visits, including state visits by United States presidents.

In 1957, he met his wife, Royal Consort ke ali'i Geneviève Emelie (née DelaCuesta) Baker, of Portuguese and Spanish descent. Geneviève had also served in the military in the Marine Corps; a Marine Private First Class Squad Leader of the squad known as the "Feather Merchants", Geneviève had been stationed in Camp Pendleton in California. Together ke ali'i George and Geneviève raised their family in Hawai'i Kai on the island of Oahu.

For the past fifty years, ke ali'i Prince George Ī'ī Baker has rendered service to the community having founded several athletics programs in the Hawai'i Kai district of Oahu and having served as a coach on many community sports teams representing all age brackets. Ke ali'i George Ī'ī is also a formidable competitor in the ancient Hawaiian Makahiki tournament events, and possesses a natural dexterity with ancient Hawaiian warrior implements such as the 'ihe (spear) and the moa pahe'e (torpedo shaped darts). 

Highly intelligent and diligent, ke ali'i George I'i was assigned to critical M.O.S. (Military Occupational Service) status, with the highest top-secret government military clearance. In 1954, ke ali'i George was dispatched to the Pentagon for cryptographic training, and from 1955 was stationed in France and Germany. In Rochefort, Western France, he was posted to a limited group of 24-hour cryptographers, entrusted with daily message decoding.

Ke ali'i Prince George Ī'ī is the eldest surviving kupuna at the time of the first public mention of an entity representing the current surviving Hoapili Baker Famiy and its Royal and ali'i legacy, and naturally as part of the surviving Royal House of Hawai'i. 

Please see the Disclaimer authorized by the HRH ke ali'i Prince George I'i Baker, (the senior living kupuna at the time of the first public mention of a Royal House in 2018), the Head of the Royal House of Hawai'i – Ka Hale Ali'i O Hoapili Baker (the Royal House of Hoapili Baker).

Herman 'Helemano' Ahpoi Lee, Jr. 

The Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family will always be grateful to an aikāne (friend) and inestimable mentor, uncle Herman 'Helemano' Lee, for his boundless historical acumen of the Hawaiian culture, his guidance and perseverence. Uncle Helemano selflessly endeavored to assist in the acknowledgement of the Royal and Ali'i Hoapili Baker Family, as well as establish an entity which correctly represents theFamily. Under the authority of the Senior Heir in 2018, ke ali'i George Ī'ī Baker, his eldest child by blood, ke ali'i Georgette Pu'a'ala Baker, and his eldest grandchild by blood and appointed Heir, ke ali'i Idony Punahele Hoapili, the trajectory and motives of the entity honoring the Hoapili Baker 'Ohana's ali'i legacy and respectable family name–Royal House of Hawai'i, Royal House of Hoapili Baker–will remain pono (righteous).

Images from the brochure created for Helemano Lee's Celebration of Life at the Kamehameha Schools Chapel, June 2019

Images from the brochure for Helemano Lee's Celebration of Life at the Kamehameha Schools Chapel, June 2019

Uncle Helemano with ke ali'i Princess Idony Punahele Hoapili, and royal Tahitian cousins of the Hoapili Baker ohana: Tuteehu, Ariimihi (granddaughter of the last Queen of Tahiti), Teora and Blanche

Helemano with ke ali'i Princess Idony Punahele Hoapili, and royal Tahitian cousins of the Hoapili Baker 'Ohana: Tuteehu, Ariimihi (Royal Heir, granddaughter of the last Queen of Tahiti), Teora and Blanche

An Act to Perpetuate the Genealogy of the

Chiefs of Hawai'i

This article is about the preservation of an archive of the descendants of high-ranking ali'i blood, initiated by an Act legislated in 1880 by the Hawaiian Legislature. The descendants inherently belong to the Estate of Nobles (Chiefs) and are eligible to be appointed as Nobles in the Legislative Assembly and are also eligible to be elected to the Throne in accordance with Hawaiian Law. The King approved and signed this Act in 1880.

King Kalākaua wanted a "Board of Genealogy of Hawaiian Chiefs" to record the genealogies of those that were of high ranking blood and could be considered in the event that someone had to be named an heir to the throne of Hawaii. The names mentioned are all the lineages that were eligible for either role according to law.

On August 9, 1880, the Hawaiian Legislature effectuated An Act to Perpetuate the Genealogy of the Chiefs of Hawaii

" AN ACT

To Perpetuate the Genealogy of the Chiefs of Hawaii

WHEREAS, it is provided by the 22d Article of the constitution that the kings of Hawaii shall be chosen from native chiefs of the kingdom; AND WHEREAS, at the present day it is difficult to ascertain the chiefs, as contemplated by said Article of the constitution, and it is proper that such genealogies of the kingdom be perpetuated, and also the history of the chiefs and kings from ancient times down to the present day, which would also be a guide to the King in the appointment of Nobles in the Legislative Assembly, therefore,

Be it enacted by the King and the Legislative Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands, in the Legislature of the Kingdom Assembled:

Section 1. His Majesty the King in Cabinet Council shall appoint some proper person or persons to collect from genealogical books, and from the knowledge of old people the history and genealogy of the Hawaiian chiefs, and shall publish a book of the doings of such Board, which shall be called "The Board of Genealogy of Hawaiian Chiefs," during such time as it may be in session.

Section 2. The Minister of Interior is hereby authorized to pay the members of said Board at a rate not exceeding two dollars per day, and for all the other expenses of the said Board, not exceeding two thousand dollars, which sum shall include the purchase of books, travelling expenses, paper, pens, ink, books and so forth, for searching for ancient things which have been lost or concealed in places of concealment, and for ascertaining the places of sepulture of the ancient chiefs, where their bones are now concealed; which sum shall be paid out of any monies not otherwise appropriated by the Appropriation Bill.

Section 3. Said Board may make such rules and regulations as may be necessary for them and for their work, and shall submit the name to His Majesty the King in Cabinet Council before commencing their duties.

Section 4. This act shall become a law from the use of its approval.

Approved this 9th day of August, A.D. 1880

KALĀKAUA  R."

According to the Rules of the Board, the principle duties of the Board members were:

"1. To gather, revise, correct and record the Genealogy of Chiefs.

2. To gather, revise correct and record all published and unpublished Ancient Hawaiian History.

3. To gather, revise, correct and record all published and unpublished Meles (Songs), and also to ascertain the object and the spirit of the Meles, the age and History of the period when composed and to note the same on the Record Book.

4. To record all the tabu customs of the Mo'īs (Kings) and Chiefs."

In its report of 1884, the Board stated it was examining some copies of genealogical books by Kamokuiki, Hao'o, Kanahi, Unauna, Hakaleleponi, Pi'ianaia, Kalaualu and David Malo, and that the "Board has not entered into revision of these books and those written by historians as the time has been taken up mostly in attesting the genealogy of those that have applied to have their genealogy established."

The Board also reported, that it "has avoided entering into controversies with the genealogical discussions that have been going on for a year or more in the local Hawaiian newspapers, as these discussions have been more or less conducted in a partisan spirit instead of on scientific principles. They loose the merit of usefulness by the hostilities assumed by the contending writers."

On July 5, 1887, the newly appointed Cabinet Council and two members of the Supreme Court committed the high crime of treason by coercing King Kalakaua to sign a new constitution under threat of assassination. This so-called constitution came to be known as the Bayonet Constitution and was never submitted to the Legislative Assembly for approval, which is required under law. Hawaiian constitutional law provides that any proposed change to the constitution must be submitted to the Legislative Assembly, and upon majority agreement, would be deferred to the next legislative session for action. Once the next legislature convened, and the proposed amendment or amendments were "agreed to by two-thirds of all members of the Legislative Assembly, and be approved by the King, such amendment or amendments shall become part of the Constitution of this country (Article 80, 1864 Constitution)."

The so-called constitution was drafted by a select group of twenty individuals and effectively placed control of the Legislature and Cabinet in the hands of individuals who held foreign allegiances, which led to the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian government by the United States of America. The leader of this insurgency, Lorrin Thurston, was the Minister of the Interior, and he refused to fund the Board of genealogists as required by law.

In a letter to her Royal Highness Princess Po'omaikelani, President of the Genealogical Board, dated July 29, 1887, Thurston writes, "I beg to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 27th inst. in which you state the labors of the board need not be suspended because the appropriation cannot be paid. There can, of course be no objection to a continuation of the work by the Board of Genealogy so long as it is carried out without expense to the Government."

Despite the lack of government funding and the illegal overthrow of the government of the Hawaiian Kingdom, the Board of Genealogy continued its work to complete the genealogies of Mo'okua'auhau Ali'i (Hawaiian Chiefs) that were eventually published in the Ka Maka'ainana newspaper in the year 1896.

The article stated that on August 3 of 1896, the Genealogies of Robert Hoapili Baker was published.

Any individual today who is a direct descendant of the Hawaiian Chiefs identified in these published genealogies belong to the Estate of Nobles (Chiefs), and are eligible to be appointed as Nobles in the Legislative Assembly. In the case of an election were the Hawaiian Islands to again become a nation with a sovereign monarchy, these direct descendants are eligible candidates to the Throne in accordance with Hawaiian law.

Genealogies of Mo'okua''auhau Ali'i (Hawaiian Chiefs) published in the Ka Maka'ainana newspaper in the year 1896

Genealogies of Mo'okua''auhau Ali'i (Hawaiian Chiefs) published in the Ka Maka'ainana newspaper in the year 1896

Translated from Hawaiian

Liloa (male) lived with (married) Akahiakuleana (female), and had Umi (male).

Umi-a-Liloa (male), married Kapulani (female), and had Umi (male).

Keawenui-a-Umi (male), married Koihalawai (female), and had Kanaloakuaana (male).

Kanaloakuaana (male), married Kaikilani (female), and had Keakealani (male).

Keakealani (male) married Kaleiheana (female), and had Moana (male).

Moana (male), married Piilani (female), and had Ilikiamoana (female).

Kauhi-a-Haki (male), married Ilikiamoana (female), and had Kahanaumalani (male), Heiaholani (male), Moana (female), Koialiipuheelani (male), and Huapuaalani (male).

Kahanaumalani (male), married Naheana (female), and had Kanuha (male).

Kanuha (male), married Kamanoheli'i I. (female), and had Napu'upahoehoe (male).

Napu'upahoehoe (male), married Maunahia (female), and had Luka (female), Malie (female), and Kamanoheli'i II (female).

High Ali'i Malie (female) married Prince Ikekeleiaiku (male), and had Kamai (female), Robert Hoapili Baker (male), Henry Kanuha (male), and Kinohou (female).

Kamai (female), married Patrick Cockett (male), and had no lineal descendants.

Robert Hoapili Baker (male), married High Ali'i Emma Merseburg (female), and had many children.

Henry Kanuha (male), married a woman and had a large family.

Kamanoheli'i II (female), married Rev. J. Kauhane o Kau, and had many children.